The Palomar London restaurant
Verdict based on 11 critic, 0 blogger and 0 user reviews and awards
Powered by Opentable

Address: 34 Rupert Street, London W1D 6DN

Website: Visit restaurant website

Telephone: +44 20 7439 8777

Restaurant close to Chinatown serving Jerusalem inspired cuisine with Mediterranean influences. This is a collaboration between the team behind London’s The End and AKA clubs and Jerusalem’s Machneyuda restaurant. Reservations are taken for the restaurant and there is also a kitchen-bar with seating on a first-come, first-served basis.

This restaurant has been awarded a Michelin Bib Gourmand

Latest reviews of The Palomar

RichardVines

Richard Vines, Bloomberg

27 May 2015

It’s not the best restaurant in London. It’s not even the best in Soho. But it is very good—when you sit at the counter…

Read full review »
jay_rayner

Jay Rayner, The Observer

12 October 2014

The Palomar (…) serves lovely food. It pulls on the traditions of the Mediterranean fringes without being overwhelmed by them, and it does so with a vigour and enthusiasm which are so utterly infectious that even this professional misanthrope had to get with the project…

Read full review »
zoe_williams

Zoe Williams, The Telegraph

8 August 2014

It’s just too mean, I’m afraid. Either up the prices and serve proper amounts, or drop the prices and make genuine “small plates”…

Read full review »
giles_coren

Giles Coren, The Times

2 August 2014

Then there was bruschetta with sardines that had been cured with a lot of salt and preserved lemon that gave them a high, Persian tang, and a bowl of the very best tahini I have ever been near, with a richness that seemed to give it the depth of an exotic peanut butter…

Read full review »

What the Critics say

RichardVines

Richard Vines, Bloomberg

27 May 2015

It’s not the best restaurant in London. It’s not even the best in Soho. But it is very good—when you sit at the counter…

Read full review »
jay_rayner

Jay Rayner, The Observer

12 October 2014

The Palomar (…) serves lovely food. It pulls on the traditions of the Mediterranean fringes without being overwhelmed by them, and it does so with a vigour and enthusiasm which are so utterly infectious that even this professional misanthrope had to get with the project…

Read full review »
zoe_williams

Zoe Williams, The Telegraph

8 August 2014

It’s just too mean, I’m afraid. Either up the prices and serve proper amounts, or drop the prices and make genuine “small plates”…

Read full review »
giles_coren

Giles Coren, The Times

2 August 2014

Then there was bruschetta with sardines that had been cured with a lot of salt and preserved lemon that gave them a high, Persian tang, and a bowl of the very best tahini I have ever been near, with a richness that seemed to give it the depth of an exotic peanut butter…

Read full review »
AA_Gill

AA Gill, The Sunday Times

20 July 2014

This food is the coming together of so much that  has difficulty getting together: a recipe can do what an army can’t. (…) I don’t want to be trite or sentimental or simplistic about peace in the  Middle East coming from the kitchen, but there is something moving and  marvellous in eating words that you can’t say…

Read full review »
Grace_Dent

Grace Dent, Evening Standard

17 July 2014

My two favourites may have been the shakshukit ‘deconstructed kebab’, a comforting plate of heavily spiced minced meat, yoghurt and tahini with pita croutons, or the cornfed chicken cooked in buttermilk with baby carrots and freekeh. (…) We left The Palomar in a giddy manner as the chefs downed shots and banged mixing bowls with whisks to ‘Let the Music Play’ by Shannon…

Read full review »
LisaMarkwell

Lisa Markwell, The Independent

13 July 2014

A deconstructed kebab is – for its ramshackle appearance (mince’n'stuff) – sensational and good value at £8.50. The beef is melting soft and, once mingled with “the four tops” of preserved lemon, yoghurt, tahini and harissa, a complex mouthful that makes one wish all local kebab shops could replicate it…

Read full review »
The_Independent

Tracey MacLeod, The Independent

28 June 2014

A salad of octopus, yogurt and chickpeas shimmers with chilli heat. From Morocco, there’s a sharp-sweet red pepper and tomato salad, matbucha, piled on to griddled toast with cured sardines…

Read full review »
FT_logo

Nicholas Lander, Financial Times

27 June 2014

Two main courses – seared scallops with a cured-lemon beurre blanc, and a most  incongruous combination of a tagine of pork belly, dried apricots and Israeli  couscous – were highly successful; a dish of sweetbread pastries with aubergine  and cumin less so. Malabi, an Israeli milk pudding with raspberries and candied  rose petals, was perfect for a sweet tooth…

Read full review »
Time_out

Guy Dimond, Time Out

4 June 2014

Palomar transported me straight back to the Tel Aviv party scene; now, it seems, the party’s come to London. Jew or Gentile doesn’t matter here, but as well as being prepared to explore modern Sephardic cooking, bring an appetite for fun…

Read full review »
davidsexton

David Sexton, Evening Standard

4 June 2014

The signature dish here, the one you should be sure to come to the bar to try even if you don’t investigate any further, is “Polenta Jerusalem style”, served in a kilner jar, smallish as a starter (£5) or larger (go for the larger) as a main (£8.50). It’s a knockout dish, crazily rich…

Read full review »