Dabbous
Cuisine: Modern European
Price:    pound pound pound_grey
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Verdict based on 13 critic, 3 blogger and 3 user reviews and awards
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Address: 39 Whitfield Street, London W1T 2SF

Website: Visit restaurant website

Telephone: +44 20 7323 1544

Ollie Dabbous’s first restaurant in Fitzrovia serving Modern European cuisine.

This restaurant has 1 Michelin Star

Latest reviews of Dabbous

andy_lynes

Andy Lynes, Metro

26 September 2012

The idea of peas with mint as a starter might not set the heart racing but the dish itself is a real pulse-quickener. The small earthenware bowl of pea mousse topped with mint granita, fresh peas in the pod and pea shoots is a riot of intense flavour. The humble vegetable has never tasted as good as this…

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hardens

Richard & Peter, Harden's

14 September 2012

Otherwise, what? Almost everything was just a total non-event: our lunch was never interrupted by a single ‘ooh’ or a single ‘ah’, just the occasional bemused “so what?”…

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Tim Hayward

Tim Hayward, Financial Times

9 June 2012

Food is presented at Dabbous without posturing and with minimal exposition, and from that simple start point, it blows you away…

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zoe_williams

Zoe Williams, The Telegraph

4 June 2012

It was fascinatingly good. The pork had been bath-cooked, we thought, then seared at the end. It had all that intensity of cured Iberico pork, without the curing. The hickory punch seemed to come mainly from the almonds, and was delicate and sophisticated…

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What the Critics say

andy_lynes

Andy Lynes, Metro

26 September 2012

The idea of peas with mint as a starter might not set the heart racing but the dish itself is a real pulse-quickener. The small earthenware bowl of pea mousse topped with mint granita, fresh peas in the pod and pea shoots is a riot of intense flavour. The humble vegetable has never tasted as good as this…

Read full review »
hardens

Richard & Peter, Harden's

14 September 2012

Otherwise, what? Almost everything was just a total non-event: our lunch was never interrupted by a single ‘ooh’ or a single ‘ah’, just the occasional bemused “so what?”…

Read full review »
Tim Hayward

Tim Hayward, Financial Times

9 June 2012

Food is presented at Dabbous without posturing and with minimal exposition, and from that simple start point, it blows you away…

Read full review »
zoe_williams

Zoe Williams, The Telegraph

4 June 2012

It was fascinatingly good. The pork had been bath-cooked, we thought, then seared at the end. It had all that intensity of cured Iberico pork, without the curing. The hickory punch seemed to come mainly from the almonds, and was delicate and sophisticated…

Read full review »
AA_Gill

AA Gill, The Sunday Times

20 May 2012

Every single dish, every plate made with such finesse, such a careful balance of flavour and texture, so much dexterous consideration for how it will be eaten, the most pleasing and simplest way to show off each ingredient to its best advantage…

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jay_rayner

Jay Rayner, The Observer

6 May 2012

Of the bigger dishes we tried, the star was a hunk of barbecued Iberico pork with a sticky-toffee mess described as a savoury acorn praline. It was sweet and umami and, being less technical, lick-the-plate-clean good…

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Zoe_Strimpel

Zoe Strimpel, City A.M.

30 April 2012

Have dessert. Particularly the custard pie. It’s the lightest dollop, faintly floral in flavour, with an apply crust. Fresh milk curds with black sugar and rose petals had the lovely taste of ricotta, only more exotic because of the surprisingly bolshy rose…

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john_lanchester

John Lanchester, The Guardian

13 April 2012

Superbly skilled and technically inventive cooking, but with no napery and faffing and need to sit up straight…

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RichardVines

Richard Vines, Bloomberg

11 April 2012

Dabbous’s dishes may appear simple. Two of the best are a salad of fennel, lemon balm and pickled rose petals; and celeriac with Moscatel grapes, burnet (a herb with a hint of cucumber) and hazelnuts. Both are so fresh, with layers of delicate flavor…

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giles_coren

Giles Coren, The Times

10 March 2012

They are going to shower the chef here, 28-year-old Ollie Dabbous, with every prize and gong and rosette that is known to man, until he can’t see out over the top of them. They are going to hold him down and stuff him with Michelin stars like a Périgord goose…

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amol_rajan

Amol Rajan, The Independent

26 February 2012

It is very important that you avail yourself of the earliest opportunity to attend Dabbous, the most thrilling addition to the London scene for yonks…

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fay_maschler

Fay Maschler, Evening Standard

2 February 2012

The star ratings on these pages correlate to the quality of cooking. Five stars is reserved for when a place comes along that changes the game…

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Time_out

Guy Dimond, Time Out

1 February 2012

The extraordinary dishes, with their sometimes earthy or even metallic flavours, are as cutting-edge as you’ll find anywhere…

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What the Bloggers say

Hugh Wright

Hugh Wright, TwelvePointFivePercent

27 May 2012

At risk of my being forever banished to Pseuds’ Corner I can only describe the pudding as moelleux, a lovely French word for which there is no direct English translation but approximately means sublimely soft, gooey and sticky – which it was…

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Cheese_and_Biscuits

Chris Pople, Cheese and Biscuits

18 April 2012

The highlights of this meal – every course from the coddled egg to the Iberico pork inclusive – rank up there with anything else you can pay for in London. As you may have picked up by now, I loved Dabbous…

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Andy_Hayler

Andy Hayler, andyhayler.com

13 April 2012

The egg dish showed that the kitchen can produce a very fine dish indeed, but I found it troubling that two dishes had some technical issues, and the dishes were not always well balanced…

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