Ametsa
Cuisine: Spanish
Price:    pound pound pound
1 user wants to go
Verdict based on 7 critic, 1 blogger and 0 user reviews and awards
Restaurant Profile »

Address: The Halkin Hotel, Halkin Street, London SW1X 7DJ

Website: Visit restaurant website

Telephone: +44 20 7333 1234

Famous father-daughter chef duo Juan Mari and Elena Arzak, of Spanish Michelin-starred Arzak restaurant, have collaborated with the Halkin Hotel. The restaurant serves ‘New Basque Cuisine’; A La Carte menus are available, but tasting menus are recommended for lunch and dinner.

This restaurant has 1 Michelin Star

Latest reviews of Ametsa with Arzak Instruction

STEVE

Steve Dinneen, City A.M.

7 August 2013

Ametsa is fussy and extravagant. It revels in its own cleverness, occasionally – although, honestly, not very often – at the expense of making something that just tastes nice. But that’s the point…

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zoe_williams

Zoe Williams, The Telegraph

7 May 2013

D had ‘Piedras Lunares’, a ‘concept’ dessert that involved five sweets shaped like rocks, with a chocolate covering and a liquefied orange centre. They were scattered on a grey, sesame-sugar sand, to look like the surface of the moon. Technically accomplished, and not very nice. Again!…

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AA_Gill

AA Gill, The Sunday Times

14 April 2013

Pudding was over-complicated. In fact, all the food made you weary just considering the amount of delicate and fiddly presentation involved…

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The_Guardian

Marina O'Loughlin, The Guardian

13 April 2013

There’s a tendency towards the overwrought. Scallops with “beta carotene”… er, do they mean carrot? The vegetable is combined with a seaweed derivative until it turns into something like a Fruit Winder…

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What the Critics say

STEVE

Steve Dinneen, City A.M.

7 August 2013

Ametsa is fussy and extravagant. It revels in its own cleverness, occasionally – although, honestly, not very often – at the expense of making something that just tastes nice. But that’s the point…

Read full review »
zoe_williams

Zoe Williams, The Telegraph

7 May 2013

D had ‘Piedras Lunares’, a ‘concept’ dessert that involved five sweets shaped like rocks, with a chocolate covering and a liquefied orange centre. They were scattered on a grey, sesame-sugar sand, to look like the surface of the moon. Technically accomplished, and not very nice. Again!…

Read full review »
AA_Gill

AA Gill, The Sunday Times

14 April 2013

Pudding was over-complicated. In fact, all the food made you weary just considering the amount of delicate and fiddly presentation involved…

Read full review »
The_Guardian

Marina O'Loughlin, The Guardian

13 April 2013

There’s a tendency towards the overwrought. Scallops with “beta carotene”… er, do they mean carrot? The vegetable is combined with a seaweed derivative until it turns into something like a Fruit Winder…

Read full review »
matthew_norman

Matthew Norman, The Telegraph

1 April 2013

We had long since become reverse Basque separatists, eager to secede from this joyless experience. “It feels as if you are being asked to admire the food rather than enjoy it,” was the verdict from across the table…

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The_Independent

Tracey MacLeod, The Independent

30 March 2013

We expected to be introduced to a new culinary language, but something has clearly got lost in translation. We came away from the Halkin feeling we’d eaten anonymous, expensive food in an anonymous, expensive hotel…

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Joe-Warwick

Joe Warwick (Metro), Metro

21 March 2013

The surprise with what is called Unexpected Sole turns out to be that the fish, hidden under a seaweed sheet that’s dissolved with a pour of hot fish stock, is overcooked, the resulting sauce beyond challenging. Worse is a seriously tough loin of lamb, wrapped with another sheet made from coffee, the trick with the hot stock repeated. The effect (…) is like watching a really disappointing indoor firework…

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What the Bloggers say

Andy_Hayler

Andy Hayler, andyhayler.com

25 March 2013

Perhaps, on balance, the Arzaks were wise to keep their name at something of a distance from this establishment. Far from a dream, I suspect that in due course Ametsa will become merely a distant memory, for all the deep pockets of its backers…

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